Witnessing both sides of the ACA

We all have differing views on the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare. But this weekend those differences hit close to home as family visited from out of town this weekend.

Benz

By COLE BENZ | Herald Editor
cbenz@countrymedia.net

We all have differing views on the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare. But this weekend those differences hit close to home as family visited from out of town this weekend.

I am a proponent of the ACA. I understand there are many pieces of it that need improving. But the purpose, and the amount of people that have been able to either acquire coverage or sustain coverage is too good to overlook.

I have pre-existing conditions. One of which is life threatening.

I fear that if it is repealed I will either be forced to cover my doctor visits, medications, and future hospital stays out of pocket, or I will be placed in a ‘high risk’ pool and be required to pay an exceedingly high premium because of my medical history.

I am like many Americans throughout the country, my story is not unique. This is a real fear that many will have to deal with if that provision is repealed under any new proposed plan.

But sitting not five feet away from me at the dinner table this weekend was my sister’s boyfriend. Here is a guy who breaks his back during the warmer months as a contract landscape worker, making an honest work in the hot sun of the summer. In the winter, he doesn’t live off of unemployment until the weather warms again.

No.

He works full-time and does what he needs to put food on the table.

But he doesn’t carry health insurance because of the cost. Regardless of how low a premium can be on the healthcare market, that’s money that he sees as more beneficial elsewhere on his budget.

But he’s about to get hit with a nearly $700 tax penalty.

Under the ACA, those who do not carry insurance or cannot provide proof of coverage will be forced to pay a penalty. It’s based off of your income, and the minimum is $695.

This provision was intended to encourage more people to buy coverage to lower the overall cost of healthcare in this country. While the move was admirable, and did get over 20 million covered, not everyone signed up, and as the law was written, the penalty increases.

It was an interesting juxtaposition.

Here I was in support of something that was going to cost him a significant amount of money.

The room was silent only briefly, but there was no animosity. We simply understood the other person. It was a reaction that I wish our Legislative Branch would experience when discussing different views on policy making, no matter the topic.

But it was sobering, it was literally a display of what is wrong with the ACA. There are parts that are really beneficial to a lot of Americans. And there are parts that severely hurt a lot of Americans.

Now those we have elected should look at these situations as an example—because I’m sure this isn’t the first time there have been a disagreement over ACA at a household.

Share this post

GAMES