Weed control headlines DREC Summer Field Day

Weed control methodology and data collected from plots at the Dickinson Research Extension Center was presented to a strong turnout of young agricultural producers at the annual Dickinson Research Extension Center summer field day July 13 at the center headquarters here.

Weeds were a big topic of discussion at the 2016 Dickinson Research Extension Center Summer Field Day. James Duletski of Southwest Grain, Dr. Greta Gramig, Dr. Brain Jenks, Calli Feland, Warren Tormaschy (partially hidden) and Vicki Tormaschy discuss a problem weed.
Weeds were a big topic of discussion at the 2016 Dickinson Research Extension Center Summer Field Day. James Duletski of Southwest Grain, Dr. Greta Gramig, Dr. Brain Jenks, Calli Feland, Warren Tormaschy (partially hidden) and Vicki Tormaschy discuss a problem weed.

Weed control methodology and data collected from plots at the Dickinson Research Extension Center was presented to a strong turnout of young agricultural producers at the annual Dickinson Research Extension Center summer field day July 13 at the center headquarters here. Other topics covered included seeding rates in small grains, grain marketing, drainage tiling and cereal crop diseases.

Dr. Brian Jenks, weed scientists at the North Central Research Extension Center in Minot, said, “One of the issues we are dealing with is weed resistance to many of our common herbicides.” He elicited horseweed, ragweed, kochia, green foxtail and wild oat.

“The best way we can mitigate the problem is with diversity,” he said. “We need to have a diverse set of crops, not grow the same crop every year. We want to include fall planted crops, spring planted crops, warm season, cool season. We want to rotate our herbicides.”

He spoke about farmers needing to know the different modes of action relative to chemicals. He said, “We need to different cultural practices and crop rotations and not rely solely on herbicides for weed control.”

Gramig is conducting research at the Dickinson Research Extension Center. “We are looking at non-chemical weed control primarily,” she said. “I focus mostly on non-chemical alternative weed management approaches. And, so we are looking at things like using sheep grazing, cover crops to suppress weeds. We are using mulches to suppress weeds.”

The research is very multi-faceted she said. “We are also looking at the effect of those things, not only on weed suppression but also on the health of the entire agro-ecosystem. So, there we’re talking about soil health, the nutrient profile in the soil and also the micro-biological communities in the soil.”

Dr. Jane Schuh, associate director for the NDSU Agricultural Experiment Station, was present at the field day saying she was impressed during her “her first visit to the DREC” noting, “It’s really nice to actually be in the area and see what’s going on on the ground.”

Schuh said the DREC is developing a new approach to have more, smaller field days throughout the year to have more contact with producers at various times. She said the concept allows producers to get critically important information “at a time that they need it,” which is good for “the economic driver of our state, which is ag.”

DREC area extension specialist in cropping systems Ryan Buetow coordinated the field day. Individuals wanting more information about research being conducted at the Dickinson Research Extension Center can contact Buetow at 701-456-1106 or the Center at 701-456-1100.

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