Pi Day-The favorite holiday of all Math geeks

While scientists celebrate Mole Day Oct. 23, math teachers celebrate Pi Day March 14.

This quartet are playing the card game called PI which Alicia Billock invented. From left:  Alicia Billock, Brian Erickson, Dane Kruger, and Noah Blickensderfer. - Photo by Shirley Halvorson
This quartet are playing the card game called PI which Alicia Billock invented. From left: Alicia Billock, Brian Erickson, Dane Kruger, and Noah Blickensderfer. – Photo by Shirley Halvorson

Submitted by

McKenzi Wehri

Posted March 28 

While scientists celebrate Mole Day Oct. 23, math teachers celebrate Pi Day March 14. Pi Day is a day to celebrate the great math discovery of William Jones, Pi. Pi is commonly taught to be 3.14, but what most do not know is that there have been five trillion places found for it. Of these five trillion places, the number sequence never ends or repeats.

The history of Pi goes back thousands of years. Greek mathematician Archimedes (287 B.C. to 212 B.C.) is believed to be the first to seriously devote himself to the understanding of Pi. However, the use of this constant goes all the way back to ancient Egypt. It was recently found that the Great Pyramids of Giza have the same ratio of perimeter to height that works out to Pi.

To show the students the importance of Pi and get kids excited about it, Mrs. Robin Stang, math teacher at Mott/Regent High School, has made Pi Day into a school tradition. The students have approximately two weeks to organize and create their Pi Day projects. Everyone is given a list of projects to choose from. Some of these ideas include: making a t-shirt, developing an original game, designing a poster or even writing a song. Mrs. Stang chose a panel of five judges to come into her class. She wanted to have a variety of judges, ranging from parents and teachers, to administration and school board members. The judges were Wayne Heckaman, Ron Benson, Bill Gion, Gayle Olson, and Heather Hertz. The students were judged on the introduction and explanation of the project, creativity, organization, subject knowledge, and overall presentation. The points awarded by the judges determined the grade each student would receive. Most of Mrs. Stang’s students made t-shirts with witty comments on them such as chicken pot Pi or TGIP (Thank God It’s Pi Day), while others students made word finds and crosswords, wrote songs, decorated the room, and made card games. Mrs. Stang’s Algebra I and Algebra II classes were the only two classes that participated in Pi Day this year.

 

Winners in the Algebra I division were- 3rd place Kayden Redich and Cade Blickensderfer, 2nd place Courtney Belile and Lexus Patton, 1st place Michael Mayer

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